Archive for the ‘Photography’ Category

Malvern Well Dressing 2019

Saturday, May 4th, 2019

Some photographs of the Springs, Spouts and Wells dressed in Malvern, Worcestershire for the 2019 Water Festival with the theme of Flight. I’ve only selected one photograph of each — in some cases there is a lot more to see than can be seen in one photograph.

Wyche Spring was decorated by children from Grove Primary School and you were supposed to try to find where the witch had dropped her potion. They won a Bronze Award.

Wyche Spring

Willow Spring was magnificently decorated with birds and driftwood sculpture and deservedly won a Gold Award in the Adult Class for Little Berry.

Willow Spring

Gardiners Common Spring was newly decorated this year with many examples of flying objects above the earth and in space, several of which don’t appear in this photograph. It won a Silver Award in the Adult Class for Thomas Gardiner’s descendants.

Gardiners Common Spring

The Eye Well had a truly amazing bird hanging from a substantial tree trunk and a dragon lying in wait.

Eye Well

Pixie’s Well (also known as the Devil’s Well) was interactive allowing folks to become bats and be photographed or videos while flapping their bat wings. The Ramsay Family and Harris Clan won a Gold Award in the Adult Class for this decoration.

Pixie s Well  was Devil s Well

Holy Well had been decorated by the Wool Shack with a mass of wollen constructions. They won a Silver Medal in the Adult Class.

Holy Well

The Cottage in the Wood Well was another new decoration this year and was beautifully constructed and executed in the grounds of the Hotel.

Cottage in the Wood Well

The Lower Wyche Trough had been decorated with wonderful kites and steps to form a flight of fancy.

Lower Wyche Trough

The Lower Wyche Spout was magnificently decorated by off road runners (the Malvern Buzzards who won a Gold Award in the Adult Class for their effort).

Lower Wyche Spout

Weaver’s Trough is always well decorated and this year was no exception linking Elgar his mysterious early love affair and kites. Susie & Ian Woodcock won a Gold Award in the Adult Class for their decoration.

Weaver s Trough

Rose Gully is always dramatically decorated and this year was no exception with kites and balloons (more than can be seen in this photograph). It won a Gold Award in the Adult Class for Holly Mount Church.

Rose Gully

The Coach House Theatre Pump was decorated by Malvern Girlguiding as has been the case for several years and won them a Silver Award in the Children’s Class.

Coach House Theatre Pump

Priory Park Spring was decorated winning a Bronze Award in the Adult Class for Branches Day Opportunities.

Priory Park Spring

Rosebank Garden Well was quite dramatically decorated this year.

Rosebank Garden Well

The Mount Pleasant Basin, which has not often been decorated, was prettily decorated this year.

Mount Pleasant Basin

Malvhina in the centre of Great Malvern was decorated to record the first manned balloon flight and won a Silver Award in the Adult Class for Dan and Karen Smith.

Malvhina

Elgar’s Enigma fountain cannot be directly decorated but the surrounding area was covered with butterflies, winning a Bronze Award in the Adult Class for Malvern School of Art.

Elgar s Enigma

The Old Bottling Works Spring continued the theme of butterflies.

Old Bottling Works Spring

Hayslad has often had a dramatic display and this year was no exception winning a Gold Award in the Adult Class for Mother Gaia.

Hayslad

Dingle Spring had a very artistic decoration winning a Silver Award in the Adult Class for Phil Ironside Artist.

Dingle Spring

The Dripping Well is one of the highest and one of the most tricky wells to reach on the hills. Carrying materials for decoration up here is no trivial matter.

Dripping Well

St. Anns’s Well was decorated with gorgeous large butterflies and insects and won a Gold Award in the Adult Class for Creative Cluster.

St Ann s Well

The Happy Valley Donkey Spout was decorated with apparent simplicity but effectiveness.

Happy Valley Donkey Spout

Lodge Fountain was very beautifully and effectively decorated winning a Bronze Award in the Adult Class for Out2gether.

Lodge Fountain

The little Trinity Trough (which is one of the awkward places to plant or photograph without being in danger of being run over by traffic) was simply decorated.

Trinity Trough

Stocks Drinking Fountain included a open birdcage — the bird had flown. It won a Bronze Award in the Adult Class for Petals Flower Shop.

Stocks Drinking Fountain

The Clock Tower was decorated inside and out (there were too many people around to photograph outside). It won a Gold Prize in the Children’s Awards for Malvern Vale Primary School.

Clock Tower

The North Malvern Tap was colourfully decorated and won a Silver Award in the Children’s Class for 1st Malvern Link Brownies and Rainbows.

North Malvern Tap

The Danzell Spring had a beautiful butterfly decoration.

Danzell Spring

The Westminster Bank Spring was full of many details.

Westminster Bank Spring

St. James’s Churchyard Spout was decorated to record Roget’s burial in the churchyard and his thesaurus enabling us to use a variety of words in our flights of fancy. It won a Bronze Award in the Adult Class for Gwyn Klee.

St James s Churchyard Spout

The West Malvern Tap was decorated with many examples of flight — several not shown in this photograph — there were plenty of bees and other insects dotted around. It won a Gold Award in the Children’s Class for St James’ Primary School.

West Malvern Tap

The Park Road Spout which I think was decorated for the first time this year included many models of bees and butterflies, and won a Gold in the Children’s Award for the 2nd Malvern Scout Group — Beaver Scouts.

Park Road Spout

Malvern Well Dressing 2013

Sunday, May 12th, 2013

In previous years, I have posted some photographs of the dressings on the wells, spas, springs, spouts, fountains, taps and troughs in Malvern, Worcestershire.  Once again this year, on Sunday 5th May, I visited all but one of the decorated wells (apologies to whoever dressed the Dripping Well this year).  This year a total of 39 of the wells were decorated and there are photographs of 38 of them here.  The theme this year was “once upon a time …”

Evendine Spring

Evendine SpringThis spring is always well decorated, and this year won a Silver Award for Aquartet.  There was an amazing amount of detail in this decoration some of which is shown in the following photographs.

Evendine Spring
Evendine Spring

Evendine Spring

Evendine Spring

Evendine Spring

Wynds Point

Wynds Point

This is a small, tap on the side of the road, that is difficult to decorate and difficult to photograph as the pavement is narrow and the road busy, but this simple decoration works well and won a Bronze for Margaret Fox.

Eye Well

DSC 6396

This well is up on the hill behind the Holy Well.  This year it was very well decorated, but was not competing for an award.

Holy Well

Holy Well

This was beautifully decorated this year and won a Gold Award for Three Generations.  Here is a photograph from the outside:

Holy Well

Devil’s Well

Over recent years this has often been beautifully decorated and this was no exception and it won a Gold Award for The Devil’s Advocates.  Here be dragons.

Devil's Well

There were also dragon’s eggs:

Devil's Well

Jubilee Fountain

Jubilee Fountain

This was more simply decorated this year, than it has been in the past, but won a Silver Award for Friends of Malvern Wells Primary School.

Lower Wyche Trough

Lower Wyche Trough

This was another relatively simply but beautifully dressed spring that won a Bronze for Caroline Harris and Jean Williams.

Lower Wyche Spout

Lower Wyche Spout

This was not competing for an award this year, and although very simply decorated was very effective.

Weaver’s Trough

Weaver's Trough

This is another small trough but which was beautifully decorated to represent the story of Excalibur and the Lady of the Lake.  It won a Gold Award for Mark and Helena Illingworth.

St. Ann’s Well

St. Ann's Well

St. Ann’s Well was not competing but had been dressed effectively.

Malvhina

Malvhina

This is Malvhina at the centre of Great Malvern, and it won a Bronze Award for Jan Bowden and John Bibby.

Enigma Fountain

Enigma Fountain 

This is the Enigma Fountain with the statue of Sir Edward Elgar.  This had been decorated to make the point about possibly the death of reading and including, amongst the “cobwebs”, books to read and exchange.  It won a Bronze Award for the Meadow Road Crew.

Enigma Fountain

Old Bottling Works Spring

Old Bottling Works Spring

This well was dressed by The Courtyard Shopping Experience and was full of detail and it won a Gold Award

Detail of Old Bottling Works Spring

Trinity Trough

Trinity Trough

This is pretty much impossible to decorate, and wasn’t competing.  It is right on the edge of a main road with no pavement.

Stocks Fountain

This was dressed by the 7th Malvern Girls Brigade and won a Silver.  This fountain has often been very well dressed and this was no exception.

Stocks Fountain

Here is another photograph of the detail of the bridge with the troll beneath.

Detail of Stocks Fountain

Clock Tower

Clock Tower

This had been beautifully decorated with lots of detail and some more decoration outside.  It won a Silver Award and was decorated by Ian Woodcock and Susan Hale.

North Malvern Tap

North Malvern Tap

This won a bronze for the 1st Malvern Link Rainbows & Brownies.  

Danzell Spring

Danzell Spring

I found this impossible to photograph well, so my apologies to Harriet Harnden who decorated it with fantastic detail and won a Silver Award.

Westminster Bank Spring

Westminster Bank Spring

A beautifully decorated spring by Malvern St. James School that won a Gold Award.

St. James’ Churchyard

St. James' Churchyard

Love decoration that was not competing for an award.

West Malvern Tap

West Malvern Tap

An outstanding decoration by West Malvern Garden and Nature Club that won a Gold Award.  There was a lot of detail in this, as shown below.

Detail of West Malvern Tap

Detail of West Malvern Tap

Detail of West Malvern Tap

Detail of West Malvern Tap

Dingle Spring

Dingle Spring

Another design based on a dragon, this won a Silver Award for Phil Ironside.

Hay Slad

Hay Slad

This was more simply decorated this year — but given the size, it is still a lot of work to decorate and there was a lot of detail.  It won a Bronze Award for Dan and Karen Smith.

Royal Well

Royal Well

The Royal Well was not entered for an award, but as always was well covered in flowers.

Wyche Spring

Wyche Spring

The Wyche Spring became Bag End and won a Gold Award for Sheila Maund.

Willow Spring

Willow Spring

Another simple and effective decoration.

Ellerslie Fountain

Ellerslie Fountain

This is another of the many springs that is in a dangerous position on the side of the road and was not competing for an award.  It is hard for anyone to decorate or photograph. 

Wilson’s Fountain

Wilson's Fountain

This decoration is on the site of the Wilson Monument.  The spring emerges just below at another dangerous corner of a road.  It won a Bronze Award for Sheila Young.

Hay Baptist Well

Hay Baptist Well

This well, at the back of the Baptist Church, was a Bronze Award for the decorators from the Malvern Baptist Church.

Coach-houseTheatrePump

Coach-house Theatre Pump

Another decoration with a lot of detail that won a Bronze Award for Girlguiding Malvern.

Rose Gully

Rose Gully

The size of Rose Gully allows extensive decoration and it won a Gold Award for Holly Mount United Reformed Church.  Again there was a lot of detail, some of which is shown in the following photographs.

Detail of Rose Gully

Detail of Rose Gully

Detail of Rose Gully

Lyttleton Well

Lyttleton Well

Unfortunately, the courtyard was closed when we visited this one, so the photograph had to be taken through the gate.  It won a Gold Award for Creative Clay.

Davenham House

Davenham House (Perrins Wellhead)

We haven’t visited this well in previous years.  It is situated in the grounds of and just outside the door of Davenham House.  It was decorated by Northleigh School (we had fun trying to find the answers to the questions from the Narnia Chronicles), and won a Silver Award.  The well has a lion statue so there is only need for a witch and a wardrobe.

Davenham House (Perrins Wellhead) - The Wardrobe

Temperance Drinking Fountain

Temperance Drinking Fountain

This was beautifully decorated — complete with a story book — and won a Gold Award for St. Joseph’s Swans and CygnetsPre-School.

Lord Sandys’ Spout

Lord Sandys' Spout

The decorations had been contributed to by virtually the entire school to gain a Bronze Award for St. Matthias School.

Barnards Green Trough

Barnards Green Trough

Over the past few years there have been a number of stunning decorations of this large trough.  This year the Wolf was in the bed and Little Red Riding Hood is on her way.  Team Trough won a Gold Award.

Railway Station Trough

Railway Station Trough

Some simple decoration that won a Bronze Award for Malvern Parish Primary School.

Earl Beauchamp’s Spout

Earl Beauchamp's Spout

This was fantastically decorated for a Very Hungry Caterpillar to win a Silver Award for Barbara Meadows.

Heron in Flight

Saturday, June 4th, 2011

I took this photograph of what I assume is a heron in flight in March while on holiday in Suffolk.  It was taken with my 70–300mm zoom at the 300mm setting.  It was a somewhat lucky shot as the bird was flying above me and I just quickly swung the camera and focussed and this was the one shot that worked.

Heron in Flight

Malvern Well Dressing 2011

Tuesday, May 3rd, 2011

Last year I posted some photographs from the Malvern Well Dressing.  This year around 40 or so of the springs, wells, pumps and troughs have been decorated, making this one of the largest well dressings in the UK.  The theme this year was “Togetherness” and with the Royal Wedding taking place on Friday, many of the wells were dressed show some connection with the Royal Wedding.  More details of the spas can be found on the Malvern Spa Association website.

Following are some photographs taken on Friday at some of the dressed wells.

Railway Station Trough

This trough is at Great Malvern Railway station and was dressed by one of the local junior schools.  The booklet is “Together Forever.”

Railway Station Trough

Malvhina

This is a spout in the centre of Great Malvern that was designed by Rose Garrard.

Malvhina

Old Bottling Works Spring

Old Bottling Works Spring

Happy Valley

This spring is part way up the Malvern Hills above Great Malvern.

Happy Valley

St. Ann’s Well

This is one of major wells on the hills where folks used to come to take the water in Victorian times.

St. Ann's Well

Weaver’s Well

This is a well which I’ve missed in the past.  It was decorated to celebrate the Royal Wedding with a pair of rings on the flower cushion in the centre.

Weaver's Well

Lower Wyche Spout

This is the upper of a pair of springs that are very close together (both are shown on the photograph of the Lower Wyche Trough

Lower Wyche Spout

Lower Wyche Trough

This shows the Trough in the foreground with the spout behind.

Lower Wyche Trough

Wyche Spring

This spring is close to the Wyche Cutting and so well up on the Hills.

Wyche Spring

Willow Spring

Willow Spring

Evendine Spring

This is another spring that was decorated to celebrate the Royal Wedding.

Evendine Spring

Royal Well

The Royal Well is actually in a location where the Victorian benefactor that provided the well also established a concert hall and other facilities, but the WInter Gardens in Great Malvern was more attractive and easier to get to, and so the facilities here didn’t last for long.

Royal Well

Hay Slad

This was very well decorated by the 7th Malvern Girls Brigade with a floral tea party.  It was worth a few photographs!

Hay Slad

Hay Slad

Hay Slad

Dingle Spring

Dingle Spring

Westminster Bank Spring

Westminster Bank Spring

West Malvern Tap

This was another Royal Wedding themed decoration that was very impressively executed.

West Malvern Tap

St. James’s Churchyard

St. James's Churchyard

Earl Beauchamp’s Spout

Earl Beauchamp's Spout

North Malvern Tap

North Malvern Tap

Clock Tower

Clock Tower

Stocks Fountain

The Stocks fountain is adjacent to the stocks (which are just behind the railings in this picture) where presumably those guilty of crimes were held for the amusement of the populace.

Stocks Fountain

Rose Gully

This was a beautifully decorated spring that was having some maintenance when I photographed it.

DSC 1997

Hay Baptist Well

This spring is just behind the Baptist Church and is quite awkward to photograph.

Hay Baptist Well

Coach House Theatre Pump

Coach House Theatre Pump

Barnards Green Trough

This was wonderfully decorated together with two straw horses at the trough.  It won a Gold Award.

Barnards Green Trough

Wilson’s Fountain

This is at an awkward place.  The actual spring comes out on the side of a road below where this photograph is taken.  The seat above the spring has been decorated.  There is also a plan to erect a memorial to Wilson (who was one of the doctors responsible for promoting the water cure in Malvern.

Wilson s Fountain

Wilson Fountain

Ellerslie Fountain

This is one of the more tricky places to decorate a spring (or to take photographs) as it is directly on the side of a busy road.

DSC 2013

Holy Well

Another Gold Award winner, very beautifully decorated.

DSC 2021

Holy Well

Eye Well

This is on a quite a high path on the hills and I think its decoration had suffered from the wind by Monday when this photograph was taken.

Eye Well

Devil’s Well

This was a new one to me, although I used to live in Malvern Wells some years ago and travelled along the road close to this spring on many occasions and probably walked on the path that comes down the hill beside it.  A lot of work seemed to have gone in to decorated this spring.

Devil's Well

Devil's Well

Jubilee Fountain

Another spectacular decoration that achieved a Gold Award with many photographs on the sides of the fountain.

Jubilee Fountain

Wynds Point

This small tap is no longer functional, but was neatly decorated on the side of the main road.

Wynds Point

Dripping Well

This is the highest spring on the hills and is very exposed — I think some of its decoration had been blown by the wind by the time of my photograph on Monday.

Dripping Well

Danzell Spring

This is another first visit for me.

Danzell Spring

Lord Sandy’s Spout

Another substantial decoration with a Wedding Breakfast made out of plants and flowers.

Lord Sandy's Spout

Lord Sandy's Spout

Lord Sandy's Spout

Temperance Drinking Fountain

Temperance Drinking Fountain

Cameras

Sunday, November 21st, 2010

As I posted previously,  I bought a Nikon D90 a few months ago.  I knew at the time, that the chances were that some compelling new camera would be released shortly after I bought the D90 (which has been around for quite a while).  On the other hand, I had been spending a lot of time failing to make a decision about a camera and felt that the time had been reached when I just needed to get a new DSLR and start building up  a lens collection.  Well, the Nikon D7000 is now in people’s hands and seemingly getting extremely good reviews.  To some extent, I can feel good as the D7000 is above the target price I was setting for my purchase.  However, some of the reviews are so good, I think my notion that at some point I might want to upgrade to a full frame DSLR may no longer hold.   The D700 was way above my price range, but I can now seriously consider an update to a D7000 or its successor in the future.

All in all, I’m very happy with my Nikon D90 and I’ve already bought in to the NIkon system with three lenses (two DX lenses and one full-frame lens).   I might feel less need to worry about spending money on DX lenses in the future.

 

RAW vs JPEG

Monday, September 27th, 2010

It is with some trepidation that I even title a blog post “RAW vs JPEG” because it seems that this is a topic akin to “sex, politics and religion” that shouldn’t be discussed in polite society.  It certainly seems to start flame wars on some of the photographic web sites.

If someone had asked me about using RAW a year ago, or I had discovered someone with a DSLR that was not using RAW, my reaction was usually to say “… but you must use RAW, it is so much better”.  I would have produced the usual arguments about having the raw data off the camera sensor, unprocessed,  so that one could use the full power of one’s computer to process it, to manipulate it safely in the knowledge that one could always go back to that pristine RAW data.  I would have produced the usual arguments about bit depth and the like and that there were a couple of extra stops of headroom for exposure compensation.  I would have produced all the arguments about the dangers of repeatedly editing JPEGs.

I’m now not at all sure about this.  As far as I know, most of the RAW formats are proprietary and whether any particular converter really reflects the manufacturer’s intent may be difficult to establish.  I think there have even been cases where RAW formats change over time (although with the same file extensions — and so not obvious to the user), but not all software will process all the variations.  Thus, I seriously doubt that RAW is a good format for long term archiving, and to some extent, with that goes the notion that at some point in the future one can reprocess one’s old RAW format images with better software and they will look even better.  The danger is that one can’t reprocess them at all.

The in camera processing that generates JPGs these days seem extremely good to me.  I’ve recently bought a Nikon D90 and a number of lenses (so I’m now committed to Nikon), and have retired an old Canon DSLR for which I only had the original kit lens.   For the last few years I’ve been using the RAW format with the Canon (there was no option on that old model for JPEG plus RAW, as far as I could tell) and although iPhoto seamlessly processes the RAW and produces JPEGs, and there is some limited RAW manipulation in iPhoto, the process is pretty slow.  I’ve used RAW because of the arguments above and because I often found that low light performance was poor and so I was for ever slightly underexposing and having to manipulate images.

With my Nikon, I’m finding that the processed JPEG files are better than I can typically produce via iPhoto (or via Nikon View NX software) and while I could spend a lot of time doing little tweaks, it doesn’t really seem worth it.

On the shooting side the disadvantage is that with shooting RAW (or RAW + JPEG) the number of continuous shots that one can take is severely reduced.  So if one is trying to just catch the right moment in an action shot, I would definitely just shoot JPEG.  On the other hand for landscapes and still life images there is no reason not to shoot RAW + JPEG other than the extra space taken up and potentially the processing time.

One of the things I remember from professionals back in the days of film was that the main difference between amateurs and professionals was that we took one shot and they shot a whole roll of film.   Taking more photographs just stacks the odds so much higher at getting just the right shot.   I recall some amazing statistics about the enormous numbers of photographs taken in order to produce the ten or so for a National Geographic article.

Given all this, my inclination is now to take more photographs, mostly JPEGs.  I shall use the histogram on the camera to check exposure and, if necessary, bracket — but even three JPEGs are typically less than one RAW image.   Yes, if I’m taking a landscape photograph perhaps I’ll shoot RAW + JPEG and perhaps even then bracket (if only for the possible option of making an HDR later), but I’m coming down more and more in favour of letting the camera do the processing and get good quality JPEGs out which require as little processing on the computer as possible.

I guess that I might have a different view if I were to change to using Aperture or Lightroom, although I think the argument for just getting the photo as “right” as possible in the first place is a pretty strong argument.

iPhoto apparently messing up geodata

Sunday, September 19th, 2010

Updated 4th October with what I think is the problem and solution

I use a Garmin GPS unit and then use HoudahGeo to geotag the photographs. I normally do this after I’ve imported the photos into iPhoto. HoudahGeo supports this usage.

However, for all of the photographs I’ve imported since the end of August, when I look at the location data either from alt-cmd-I or from looking at the little map reached from from cmd-I, it appears that the geodata has been changed. Typically what seems to happen is that if a set of photographs end up with the same placename (although different lat-long), the lat-long is replaced by the centre of the place. It is really strange because the data shown on alt-cmd-I for a group of photographs is all the same, but if one use “show file” to access the actual photograph and then look at the exit data via Preview, then that data is different (and is the correct data as orginally added to the image). “Rescan for Location” doesn’t solve the problem, indeed it might even be the cause of it.

The same applies if I tag the images first and then import them. However, all photographs imported before the end of August are fine. They may all have been taken in one town (and have the same place name from the reverse geo lookup but the coordinates are the correct coordinates.

This has had me running around in circles all day.   I’ve posted to the Apple forums so will see what transpires.  Perhaps its time to move on to using Aperture or Lightroom.

Update:

The problem seems to be that I had previously made up my own location for photos that I’d taken before I had a GPS unit. It appears that any properly geotagged photos that fall within the circle for that location end up being stored in the database with that name and with their location given as the centre of that circle. Looking at all of my photographs on the map view in places and sufficiently expanding it, it seem that every photo in the vicinity of a location that I have added has had its place recorded at the place where I’d put the pin and not using the precise information in the photograph. This is not what I want — I want the location so that I can geotag roughly photos taken before I had a GPS, but for subsequent ones I want their location recorded precisely not in this general area. I’m not quite sure how to sort this out.

It seems that locations I’ve created manually in iPhoto with reasonably generous size capture photos which have real geolocation in their Exif data and then display their location as the centre of the manually created location. I think I need to go through all of the manually created locations and shrink them and then the good geodata should show up after a rescan for location. I’ve not had much time to do that so far, but one test seemed to show that that will work.

Fortunately I haven’t created too many locations so should be able to solve this fairly quickly. In future when I go back to manually tag locations for photos without location data I shall either use very small locations or perhaps use an external tool to tag them and avoid creating locations within iPhoto.

Photographs from new camera

Monday, September 6th, 2010

I’ve recently bought a Nikon D90.  I know this is not exactly a new camera; it is probably due for replacement fairly soon, and my reasons for buying it will probably be the topic of a future blog post.  However, I thought I’d post a photograph which was taken on the first day I had the camera and for which the JPG produced in camera was pretty good.  I’d also shot in raw and processed the raw through Topaz Adjust using more or less the preset “Spicify” setting.  This gave the second version shown here.  I”m not sure what it is about this photograph but I really like it.

So, here is the JPG out of the camera:

Cottage — JPG from camera

Here is the version that was from the RAW and through Topaz adjust:

Cottage with Topaz Adjust — Spicify

Updated post about using Topaz filters for high ISO photography

Monday, August 16th, 2010

A few weeks ago Topaz Labs announced an update to their Denoise filter to Denoise 5.  Having installed this I thought I should reprocess the example in a previous post to see how it worked for me.  I think the end result is pretty good given that the original photograph was a couple of stops underexposed at the highest ISO setting of my rather old Canon 300D (the original Digital Rebel in the US).

The 10 Second Pre-Shoot Camera Check

Tuesday, July 20th, 2010

I’ve posted a number of times about the mishaps of not necessarily knowing how one’s camera works, or failing to check things first.  This article provides a good check list: The 10 Second Pre-Shoot Camera Check